Air pollution in cities is worse for those on public transport…

Air pollution in our cities and towns is becoming an important issue. The toll on lungs already suspect through asthma or Chronic Lung Disease is high, and the pollution degrades our historic buildings. Cold still weather in winter does not help.

Image result for air pollution cartoon

Ben Webster in The Times reports 14th Feb 2017: Commuters warned of new air pollution risk

Public transport worse than driving for exposure to harmful particles

Travelling by public transport exposes commuters to up to eight times as much air pollution as those who drive to work, a groundbreaking study found.

In the latest evidence of the health risks posed by rising traffic levels, researchers found that drivers commuting in diesel cars did the most harm to the wellbeing of other travellers — producing six times as much pollution as the average bus passenger.

The authors said that the results revealed a “violation of the core principle of environmental justice” because those who contributed most to air pollution in cities were least likely to suffer from it. People in poorer areas, who are more reliant on buses to get to work, suffer greater exposure than those in wealthier neighbourhoods, who are more likely to commute by car, according to the study by the University of Surrey.

Air pollution causes 40,000 premature deaths a year in Britain and diesel vehicles are a large contributor to the problem, producing high levels of particulates and toxic nitrogen oxides, which can cause respiratory disease and heart attacks. Of Britain’s 5.4 million asthma sufferers, two thirds say that poor air quality makes their condition worse.

Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, is due to introduce a £10 daily “toxicity charge” on pre-2005 diesel cars in central London this year and has called for a national scrappage scheme to encourage diesel drivers to buy cleaner vehicles. The government will publish a plan in April for tackling air pollution after the previous one was ruled inadequate by the High Court.

The latest study involved commuters wearing air pollution monitors who undertook hundreds of journeys by car, bus and Tube. Bus passengers were exposed to concentrations of particles, known as PM10, which were five times higher than those experienced by car commuters. Levels of PM2.5 fine particles, which can be more lethal as they are drawn deep into the lungs, were twice as high on buses as in cars. Bus journeys were typically 17-42 minutes longer than car journeys, meaning that bus passengers were exposed to higher levels of pollution for longer. Motorists tend to keep windows closed and are protected by filters stopping particles and dust from entering the interior. Bus passengers, by contrast, are subjected to pollution at stops when the doors are opened, often in places where queues of idling vehicles are pumping out high levels of toxic gas and particles.

Diesel buses on average produce three times as many particles per mile as diesel cars but they typically carry 20 times as many people…..

Thursday 07 Jul 2016 , from Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Research highlights potential of low-cost air pollution sensors

Surrey academic Dr Prashant Kumar has published a comprehensive review on managing air pollution in cities through low-cost sensing – and how this could influence the exposure control of city dwellers in future

ZeeMedia Bureau reports from India 7th February: “Rising deaths connected to increase in air pollution says Greenpeace; slams government for taking no action”.

The Times evidence: Diesel disease

 

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